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TEM Blog

The Entrepreneurial Musician Blog by Andrew Hitz featuring articles on being an entrepreneur in the music business. Show notes for The Entrepreneurial Musician Podcast.

Start Before You Are Ready

Andrew Hitz

Did you know you can now follow TEM on Instagram? The handle is @TEMPodcast (same as Twitter.)

Here's a short Instagram video I made about my favorite quote from the wonderful Steven Pressfield book, "Do the Work", which is the subject of my next TEM Book Report.

Show Notes for Episode 86: "TEM Short: Beware the External Should's"

Andrew Hitz

Listen via:

iTunes
SoundCloud
Stitcher

This TEM Short is in response to my interview with Dana Fonteneau in Episode 85.

Are "external should's" holding you and your art back?

Topics Covered:

  • 1:35 - Why the word should is dangerous (and easier to spot in other people)
  • 5:27 - The example of my good friend and colleague Joanna Hersey and how she went against a strong "external should" and has thrived
  • 7:56 - An example mentioned previously by David Cutler about a "should" that steers an entire corner of the our industry
  • 10:34 - A good strategy to battle "should's"

Links:

It would mean the world to me if you felt like making a small donation to support what I'm doing with TEM. You can find out more at:

https://www.patreon.com/tempodcast

Produced by Joey Santillo

Show Notes for Episode 85: Dana Fonteneau

Andrew Hitz

Listen via:

iTunes
SoundCloud
Stitcher

Dana Fonteneau, the woman behind the WholeHearted Musician and the author of It's Not (JUST) About the Gig: A Musician's Guide to Creating the Mindset Which Leads to Career Success and Fulfillment, speaks about getting to know your why and how that informs everything you do as an entrepreneur.

Topics Covered:

  • 5:54 - Dana's journey from chamber musician to licensed psychotherapist, mindset coach and consultant
  • 10:43 - What exactly is The WholeHearted Musician and how she chose to structure it and what to offer (and how that's morphed over the years)
  • 15:07 How she got her first consulting clients before she had a proven track record (and how that relates to her most effective marketing tool today)
  • 21:38 Why her book is "backwards" compared to a lot of entrepreneur classes in that it first makes you ask questions of yourself to figure out your why before starting with the how like resumes and websites
  • 29:57 - An example of someone who "made it" in the music business at an early age and was miserable because he spent no time envisioning what traditional success was going to look like
  • 32:49 - Holding yourself accountable and how all entrepreneurs can struggle with that (and the formula she uses today to hold herself accountable)
  • 42:30 - How getting to the bottom of your "why" specifically relates to being an entrepreneur

Links:

Favorite Quotes:

  • "Nobody wanted to hear it because I was just screaming about what I thought people needed and not really addressing their needs."

  • "I still think that face-to-face connection is essential to building trust in a relationship. That's probably my most effective marketing tool."

  • "We have these external models or we have these external should's that say 'This is the only way you're going to do it and if you don't do it this way you're a failure' and nobody stops to questions 'What is success for me? What would I love to do and what do I need to do it?' So in a way I think we're asking all the wrong questions."

  • "To know ourselves is our greatest resource."

  • "It's really about failing over and over and over again and saying 'Thank you for the failing. Thank you for the learning. Thank you for the course correction.'"

  • "When you have an inspired purpose, success is a byproduct."

Help me get to my $25 per episode goal on Patreon and get a mini-consultation with me!

And you can help me get to 50 ratings on iTunes. Thanks to everyone who has already left a rating!

Thanks for all the help spreading and supporting TEM. It means the world to me.

Produced by Joey Santillo

Don't Research During Prime Working Time

Andrew Hitz

"Never do research in prime working time." 

—Steven Pressfield

Well this quote sure was a kick in the pants for me. Actually, the entire book it comes from, Do The Work, has been one giant kick in the pants.

(Note: In the very near future, an upcoming episode of TEM will be a "Book Report" about this book. It's awesome.)

In his book, Pressfield warns about researching too much. To break down his argument to its simplest form, doing too much research is a crutch for not actually doing the work you are avoiding. He warns that it can become resistance.

We are all guilty of that from time to time. Some people are guilty of that all the time!

What I really love about this quoteis how he warns about doing research in the prime working hours of a day rather than doing actual work. This immediately led to me examining my working habits and making sure I'm utilizing my time and my brainpower to the best of my abilities.

As a side note that doesn't pertain directly to research, I have stopped cleaning up my inbox when I first sit down to work in the morning after my shower and coffee. This is prime mental capacity time for me (which I've only recently put my finger on since I'm finally paying attention to such things) and that is wasted by returning simple emails or deleting others.

The corollary to that is that I am pretty much braindead every single day at 4 pm. I don't know why but I am. If I try to pump out another 500 words for my next book at 4 pm it will take me four times as long as it would at 9 am. And it will suck!

So the combination of really paying attention to the data of when I work best (in terms of time of day, how much sleep I've gotten, what I've eaten and many other factors) and Pressfield's advice of not doing research in prime working hours has been a boon to my productivity.

Show Notes for Episode 84: "TEM Short: Should Deadlines Be Flexible?"

Andrew Hitz

Listen via:

iTunes
SoundCloud
Stitcher

This TEM Short is in response to my interview with John Beder in Episode 83.

Is a lack of a deadline holding your project back?

Topics Covered:

  • 1:22 - How John had some flexible deadlines throughout the process but had a very hard deadline at the end of the project (with consequences for not meeting it!) which brought it across the finish line
  • 4:09 - How we can apply this to each of our own projects like making a website and why deadlines are important
  • 5:21 - Seth Godin's insistence that any project have a hard ship deadline that will be met no matter what
  • 6:10 - How freeing it is to realize (like John did while making this film) that your best work is still ahead of you
  • 7:30 - Do you have any projects that are floundering because they don't have a specific, immovable deadline for shipping (Spoiler: I do!)

Links:

It would mean the world to me if you felt like making a small donation to support what I'm doing with TEM. You can find out more at:

https://www.patreon.com/tempodcast

Produced by Joey Santillo

Show Notes for Episode 83: John Beder

Andrew Hitz

Listen via:

iTunes
SoundCloud
Stitcher

Musician turned filmmaker John Beder talks about making the the film "Composed" and all the entrepreneurial lessons he learned along the way that can also apply to any musician.

Topics Covered:

  • 7:13 - John's background in music and the self-aware moment that led to him transitioning to becoming a filmmaker

  • 12:00 - The six-year period where he didn't pursue either music or filmmaking and entered the corporate world including working for Apple in multiple countries (and the lessons he learned)

  • 16:52 - John gives some details into his film, Composed, which is about the how and the why of performance anxiety in music

  • 18:30 - Which lessons about performance anxiety he learned from the movie that can be applied to the entrepreneurial side of being an artist

  • 25:37 - How he used deadlines throughout the filmmaking process (and if they moved or were firm)

  • 31:53 - What lessons he learned about himself through the process of making the film and the importance of battling "the resistance"

  • 38:15 - How he took a great idea (which we all have!) and actually turned it into a film that was shared with the world

  • 44:28 - Did he ever want to quit?

  • 53:22 - How he raised money to fund such a big project

  • 1:02:03 - Why he couldn't have made this film without being a musician first

Links:

"Composed" Documentary
Parker Mouthpieces
Ranaan Meyer: Episode 1
Jeff Nelsen: Episode 5
Linchpin by Seth Godin
(le) poisson rouge
Casey Neistat YouTube Channel

Favorite Quotes:

"There would be times when the camera would be shut off and I'd be putting away all of my stuff and I would have these mini-conversations with people and tell them 'Just so you know, you are helping me to create this film. You're giving me advice on how to create a piece of art and present it to the world and how to prepare for that.'"

"This will be a representation of me as a filmmaker on October 1, 2016. If I make another film, the first one doesn't have any bearing on that, for me personally at least. It will be better and I'll be a better film maker."

It would mean the world to me if you felt like making a small donation to support what I'm doing with TEM. You can find out more at:

https://www.patreon.com/tempodcast

Produced by Joey Santillo

The Allure of Doing the Urgent

Andrew Hitz

Here's another truth bomb from my spirit animal, Seth Godin. This one is less than 150 words.

The reason we go for urgent is that it makes us feel competent. We’re good at it. We didn’t used to be, but we are now.

Important, on the other hand, is fraught with fear, with uncertainty and with the risk of failure.

I would highly encourage you to take the 60 seconds and read the article.

Show Notes for Episode 82: "Book Report: The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing"

Andrew Hitz

Listen via:

iTunes
SoundCloud
Stitcher

A brief overview of The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing, a book that changed how I view marketing and even informed the art I make.

(If you have a book you would like for me to read and feature in a future Book Report segement, please email me through the email link in the upper righthand corner. Thanks!)

Topics Covered:

  • 2:20 - Arts marketing is the exact same thing as marketing anything else
  • 4:30 - Law #1: The Law of Leadership
    • It's better to be first than to be better
    • Everyone knows Charles Lindbergh and no one knows poor Bert HinklerTime for Three is the first classical string trio with two violins and a bass to cross genres
  • 9:15 - Law #2: The Law of the Category
    • If you can't be first in a category, set up a new category you can be first in
    • Amelia Earhart is not known as the third person to fly solo across the Atlantic but rather as the first woman (a new category)
    • Cirque du Soleil blended the circus, opera and ballet to create their own category
  • 11:50 - Law #3: The Law of the Mind
    • It is better to be first in the mind than it is to be first in the marketplace
    • This doesn't contradict the Law of Leadership - The Law of Leadership just makes it easier to be first in the mind
    • Canadian Brass is synonymous with brass quintet in spite of coming many years after the Chicago Brass Quintet and New York Brass Quintet
  • 13:45 - Law #4: The Law of Perception
    • Marketing is not a battle of products but a battle of perception
    • Amanda Palmer is probably not the best singer in the world and yet she became the first artist to raise over a million dollars on Kickstarter
    • Hands on a Hardbody was an award winning Broadway musical that closed after just 56 performances so was not perceived as a great show in spite of the accolades
  • 17:00 - Law #5: The Law of Focus
    • The most powerful concept in marketing is owning a word in the prospect's mind
    • David Cutler of The Savvy Musician owns the word "savvy" in the musical world
  • 18:40 - Law #6: The Law of Exclusivity
    • Two companies can not own the same word in the prospect's mind
    • Canadian Brass are known for wearing full tails and white sneakers. Many years later Dallas Brass tried to tap into that by wearing cowboy boots as their trademark but it never stuck because Canadian Brass already owned unique footwear in the brass quintet world
    • Like a political campaign, as soon as you are on your opponent's message you are almost certainly going to lose that election
  • 20:35 - Law #17: The Law of Unpredictability
    • Unless you write your competitor's plans you can't predict the future
    • Boston Brass made some very unpredictable changes to their show about 20 years ago (like singing barbershop quartet tunes) which differentiated their show from that of other brass quintets
  • 25:00 - Law #19: The Law of Failure
    • Failure is to be expected and encouraged
    • Sam Walton of Walmart fame used to say "Ready, Fire, Aim"
    • Cirque du Soleil had a show in 2009 called "Banana Shpeel" that lasted less than a year which cost them millions but they have gone on to premiere numerous hit shows since then
    • The only failures that are bad are failures you don't learn from

Links:

The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing by Al Ries and Jack Trout
Parker Mouthpieces
Ranaan Meyer: Episode 1
The Savvy Musician's 10 Tips for 2017 with David Cutler: Part 1 and Part 2
The Brass Junkies: JD Shaw

It would mean the world to me if you felt like making a small donation to support what I'm doing with TEM. You can find out more at:

https://www.patreon.com/tempodcast

Produced by Joey Santillo

Show Notes for Episode 81: Make Yourself Famous

Andrew Hitz

Listen via:

iTunes
SoundCloud
Stitcher

An episode about the different ways to make yourself famous (and why it's important!)

Topics Covered:

4:00 - The two ways to get famous (and which one is a lot easier!)
6:20 - The definition of branding (that's actually useful)
8:30 - Identifying exactly who your audience is and what do they value (and where you can best reach them)
15:10 - Why content marketing is a good strategy for making yourself famous
17:30 - How I became well-known in the tuba community (Spoiler: It had to do with circumstances and not being great)
19:20 - Why making yourself "famous" has nothing to do with ego

Links:

The Savvy Musician's 10 Tips for 2017 with David Cutler: Part 1 and Part 2
Ariel Hyatt: Episode 49
The Savvy Arts Venture Challenge
21CM
Parker Mouthpieces
The Brass Junkies Episode 3: Michael Parker

It would mean the world to me if you felt like making a small donation to support what I'm doing with TEM. You can find out more at:

https://www.patreon.com/tempodcast

Produced by Joey Santillo

Show Notes for Episode 80: "TEM Short: If It's Not a $#%& Yes, It's a No"

Andrew Hitz

Listen via:

iTunes
SoundCloud
Stitcher

This TEM Short is in response to my interview with Emilio Guarino in Episode 79.

The surefire way to decide whether you should take on a project or anything else.

It would mean the world to me if you felt like making a small donation to support what I'm doing with TEM. You can find out more at:

https://www.patreon.com/tempodcast

Produced by Joey Santillo

Show Notes for Episode 79: Emilio Guarino, Author of "Make It: A Guide For Recent Music Graduates"

Andrew Hitz

Listen via:

iTunes
SoundCloud
Stitcher

Topics Covered:

  • What inspired him to write his first book
  • How 90% of the book is based on personal experiences beginning with graduate school (when he was first on his own financially)
  • The in my opinion awesome fact that every chapter of his book ends with "Action Steps" for the reader to take (I wish more books like this did that!)
  • How your body is going to make a routine for yourself whether you set one or not
  • The incredible percentage of any given day which is just comprised of habit
  • How he keeps a daily journal of all of his thoughts throughout the day and when he goes back and reads them he tries to translate them into actions he can take
  • The importance of blocking out time for something important each and every day where he tells the world to go away and just focuses on that task
  • Change is the only constant
  • The Gig Triangle (the metric I use to decide whether I am going to say yes to something today)
  • How self-publishing the book was enough work that he
  • Why if you have no entrepreneurial experience that designing and selling a sticker for a project (like a band you're in) will teach you a lot about business
  • The many things (like a book mockup) you have to do when you self-publish
  • What he would do differently if he publishes a second book
  • The importance of customers finding your product in the channels they're already hanging out in

Links:

Favorite Quotes:

  • "Use routine to your advantage. Set small, daily goals that are realistically achievable for you that inch you toward your desired outcome."
  • "I think the master habit that you need to get in place is the habit of reviewing your habits."
  • "I wouldn't recommend writing a book for money. There are better ways to go about that."

Show notes for all episodes of TEM including links to all books and websites referenced in this episode can be found at:

http://www.andrewhitz.com/shownotes

It would mean the world to me if you felt like making a small donation to support what I'm doing with TEM. You can find out more at:

https://www.patreon.com/tempodcast

Produced by Joey Santillo

Show Notes for Episode 78: The Savvy Musician's 10 Tips for 2017 with David Cutler (Part 2)

Andrew Hitz

Listen via:

iTunes
SoundCloud
Stitcher

David Cutler offers up 10 unusual and incredibly thought-provoking tips for 2017. Part 1 is the first five. Guaranteed to make you think and give you some actionable ideas to move your art forward in 2017!

6. Success isn't what it used to be
7. Whatever you do, don't earn as much as possible
8. Build your portfolio (career)
9. Hang out with the wrong crowd
10. Avoid working your way up

(Check out Episode 77 for Tips 1-5)

And don't forget to click on the link below for the 2017 Savvy Arts Venture Challenge. It is a phenomenal, career-changing event and scholarships are available. 

Links:

Savvy Arts Venture Challenge
Parker Mouthpieces
Lauren Pierce: Episode 57
Susan de Weger: Episode 71

Favorite Quotes:

"I am a big advocate of having specific concrete numbers that you write down so you know what constitutes success and then you can see how you did. So you actually know whether you were successful."

"Make yourself famous."

Show Notes for Episode 77: The Savvy Musician's 10 Tips for 2017 with David Cutler (Part 1)

Andrew Hitz

Listen via:

iTunes
SoundCloud
Stitcher

David Cutler offers up 10 unusual and incredibly thought-provoking tips for 2017. Part 1 is the first five. Guaranteed to make you think and give you some actionable ideas to move your art forward in 2017!

  1. Get to the end
  2. Get small but make it HUGE
  3. Fail your way to success
  4. Look for opportunities where they don't exist
  5. Embrace your inner weirdo

(Check out Episode 78 for Tips 6-10)

And don't forget to click on the link below for the 2017 Savvy Arts Venture Challenge. It is a phenomenal, career-changing event and scholarships are available. 

Links:

Savvy Arts Venture Challenge
Parker Mouthpieces
@JacobsQuotes
Brian Pertl: Episode 6

Favorite Quotes:

(This episode is FILLED with them so I just picked a couple of random ones. So much gold from Dr. Cutler!)

"Find what's most interesting about you, and if you don't have that thing in your bio, you are missing an opportunity. How many bios have we read? I'll tell you...nobody cares where you went to school. Nobody cares what teachers you had. Nobody cares what awards you had in a lot of worlds because everybody has those things."

"Well thank you, Mr. Hitz, for most of this interview."

Show notes for all episodes of TEM including links to all books and websites referenced in this episode can be found at:

http://www.andrewhitz.com/shownotes

It would mean the world to me if you felt like making a small donation to support what I'm doing with TEM. You can find out more at:

https://www.patreon.com/tempodcast

Produced by Joey Santillo

Show Notes for Episode 76: Business Model Canvas with Lance LaDuke

Andrew Hitz

Listen via:

iTunes
SoundCloud
Stitcher

The Business Model Canvas is a tool that every single person listening to this podcast should use and this talk with Lance LaDuke is a great place to start!

Lance regularly teaches the Business Model Canvas to his Business of Music class at Carnegie Mellon University and does a great job of explaining why it is such a powerful tool. The Business Model Canvas will help get ideas out of your head and organized in an way that makes clear what your next steps need to be. I can't recommend the process any more highly for anyone.

Links:

Business Model Generation
Business Model You*

*FWIW I am a huge fan of ebooks and audio books but would highly recommend the hard copy of each of these books. They are quite visual.

Show notes for all episodes of TEM including links to all books and websites referenced in this episode can be found at:

http://www.andrewhitz.com/shownotes

It would mean the world to me if you felt like making a small donation to support what I'm doing with TEM. You can find out more at:

https://www.patreon.com/tempodcast

Produced by Joey Santillo

Show Notes for Episode 75: Idea Sex

Andrew Hitz

Listen via:

iTunes
SoundCloud
Stitcher

This episode is about the James Altucher concept Idea Sex which I learned from his book, Choose Yourself, and a very simple exercise you can do on a daily basis to learn how to produce great ideas.

Topics Covered:

  • How old ideas and new ideas mate to become their own idea
  • The importance of taking any ideas or inspirations you have and putting them into action
  • Doing James Altucher's incredibly simple 10 ideas a day challenge for one full year
  • How at some point you need to stop just watching YouTube clips of great basketball players and actually play some basketball if you want to become a good basketball player
  • How I answered a student when they asked "How do I get my first income stream?"
  • One of my ideas from the past that seemed really good and really wasn't
  • Why you really have to reserve your name .com as a URL if it is available even if you don't do anything with it right away

Links:

Choose Yourself by James Altucher
The James Altucher Show
"How To Have Great Ideas" by James Altucher
Jessica Meyer: Episode 73
andrewhitz.com/tem
facebook.com/hitztuba
instagram.com/hitztuba
 

Show notes for all episodes of TEM including links to all books and websites referenced in this episode can be found at:

http://www.andrewhitz.com/shownotes

It would mean the world to me if you felt like making a small donation to support what I'm doing with TEM. You can find out more at:

https://www.patreon.com/tempodcast

Produced by Joey Santillo

Show Notes for Episode 74: "TEM Short: Write It For Them, Not For You"

Andrew Hitz

Listen via:

iTunes
SoundCloud
Stitcher

This TEM Short is in response to my interview with composer and violist Jessica Meyer in Episode 73.

This episode explores how whenever writing anything, from a bio to a grant proposal, we always have to keep the recipient in mind when choosing the channel, wording and messaging and have to avoid writing as if we ourselves are the intended audience.

Show notes for all episodes of TEM including links to all books and websites referenced in this episode can be found at:

http://www.andrewhitz.com/shownotes

It would mean the world to me if you felt like making a small donation to support what I'm doing with TEM. You can find out more at:

https://www.patreon.com/tempodcast

Produced by Joey Santillo

Show Notes for Episode 73: Jessica Meyer

Andrew Hitz

Listen via:

iTunes
SoundCloud
Stitcher

Jessica Meyer is a violist, composer, entrepreneur and music business consultant based in New York City. I absolutely love her approach to the music business and to life. Quite inspiring!

Topics Covered:

  • Jessica had two degrees from Juilliard, was living in New York and yet her phone wasn't ringing because she was primarily only hanging out with her husband and not intentionally networking
  • How when missing two notes in the 6th round of the Buffalo Philharmonic audition prevented her from winning an $18,000/year job she realized there was a problem with the traditional orchestral model which inspired her and her husband to start their own ensemble
  • The incredible number of things like grant writing, budgeting, making a website, branding and many other things which they had to suddenly learn how to do (and which their top-notch Juilliard educations didn't prepare them for)
  • How running your own ensemble is like owning a house rather than renting (you get to customize anything you want but any repairs or upkeep are your problem)
  • The very large ensemble they hired (at a large expense) which lead to their first New York Times review which in turn has lead to a review every single year
  • How Jessica became a professional composer at the age of 40 (Spoiler: She relied on her pre-existing network that she had intentionally developed)
  • The importance of her being able to stand in front of people and succinctly tell them about her music
  • The key to writing a great grant proposal (It's easier than you think!)
  • Why she starts her networking seminars off by having people figuring out exactly what makes them them
  • Why it's important to practice stating within a conversation what you do in at most two sentences (and why you should have one of these soundbites for each different thing you do)
  • Why you have to be your own advocate for what you do (and why Jessica prefers the term "advocate for yourself" rather than "selling yourself")
  • How even if you have management you need to be out there "shaking the trees"
  • Why it's important that when you find yourself in a serendipitous moment (career-wise) you need to speak up and get the ball rolling
  • Why solving problems for other people or making random introductions for no reason will serve you well in the long run
  • Gary Vaynerchuck's 51/49 Rule
  • How all relationships are feeding your career (which means more than just liking Facebook posts)

Links:

Favorite Quotes:

"You have to spend money to make money. That's how it works."

"(Grant writing) is like networking. It's not about you. It's not about how great your art is. It's not about how great you play. It's not about how great this composer is. How are you making the lives better of the people you are serving."

"How can I advocate for myself and my colleagues?"

"You just keep asking. And there'll be a lot of no's. And you just keep asking anyway."

"The people who are successful...are the ones willing to do the mundane things that other people are not."

It would mean the world to me if you felt like making a small donation to support what I'm doing with TEM. You can find out more at:

https://www.patreon.com/tempodcast

Produced by Joey Santillo

We Don't Have a Talent Problem. We Have a Shipping Problem.

Andrew Hitz

"We don't have a talent problem. We have a shipping problem."
—Seth Godin from "Linchpin"

First of all, if you are the skimming type, at the bottom of this post there is a link to a book that Seth Godin has been generous enough to let me offer to my audience for free. Follow the link to get your free copy.

First of all, if you have not read Seth Godin's book "Linchpin" you should immediately stop reading my little blog here and go purchase it immediately. No seriously. Go do it right now. (And for the record that is not an affiliate link. I would of course let you know if it was. You just need to read the book because there is some life changing stuff in it.)

I just finished reading (actually listening since I am an Audible junky) "Linchpin" it for the second time and there will be a third time through it very soon.

The title of this post is a quote from the book and it is a blatant call to action.

Have you been "in the process" of writing a book for the last 18 months? I dare you to look in the mirror and say out loud that the reason you haven't published it (whether that means self-published or with a publisher) is because you are waiting to become a better writer.

Even if you might quietly think to yourself that that is a factor, I bet that if you say it out loud your bs detector is going to go off. In fact I guarantee it will.

(And you can substitute performing a recital, composing a symphony, opening a teaching studio, booking a tour for your band or anything else for writing a book.)

Because what's the way to get better as a writer? IT'S TO PUBLISH MORE DAMN BOOKS.

It's not to think about becoming a better a writer. It's not to read blog posts like this. And at some point (which is a lot earlier than a lot of us like to admit) it is not to read books, listen to podcasts, or watch videos telling us how to be a better writer.

You can accumulate all the information and inspiration in the world and if you don't actually write (and ship!) anything then what the hell are you really doing? Not much is the answer.

The first iteration of my second book is a lot better than the first iteration of my first book (even though they are two volumes from the same series.)

The launch of my second podcast was a lot better than the launch of my first podcast.

That's because the only way to truly learn anything is by shipping.

I used the word "you" in this post over and over again. And obviously I have shipped albums, podcasts, books, websites (all plural) over the years. But I promise you I am writing this post as a reminder to myself.

What the hell am I waiting to acquire more "talent" (whatever the hell that even means) or more knowledge or more financial support before I ship? Avoidance and fear never lead to learning. But shipping does.

So go ship.


Through the incredible generosity of Seth Godin I can offer you a copy an ebook copy of "Seth Godin: Live at Carnegie Hall" for free. You can click on the cover or click here to get your free copy.