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TEM Blog

The Entrepreneurial Musician Blog by Andrew Hitz featuring articles on being an entrepreneur in the music business. Show notes for The Entrepreneurial Musician Podcast.

TEM 98: The World You'd Like to Live In (TEM Short)

Andrew Hitz

Listen via:

iTunes
SoundCloud
Stitcher

This TEM Short is in response to my interview with Mark Rabideau of 21CM in Episode 97.

Links:

TEM 97: Mark Rabideau of 21CM on Being Authentic, Remaining Curious and Straying from Traditional Career Paths
TEM 95: Tim Topham on Building a Community of True Fans in an Already Crowded Space, Launching a Successful Membership Site and Minimum Viable Products

You can help me reach two specific goals I've set for TEM:

1. Help me get to $50 per episode on Patreon by pledging as little as $1 per episode to support the show:  https://www.patreon.com/tempodcast

2. Help me get to my goal of 50 ratings at iTunes (I'm really close!) by leaving a rating and review.

And finally, a huge thank you to Parker Mouthpieces for providing the hosting for TEM.

Produced by Joey Santillo

TEM Bonus Episode: Get a Copy of "Seth Godin: Live at Carnegie Hall" Completely FREE

Andrew Hitz

Listen via:

iTunes
SoundCloud
Stitcher

Seth Godin spoke to Juilliard students about the state of today's music business and what it takes to succeed and he has graciously allowed me to transcribe it and offer it to the TEM audience as a free ebook.

Click here to get your free copy of Seth Godin: Live at Carnegie Hall from TEM Books

Seth gave a predictably mind-blowing talk and every single musician in the world needs to hear what he had to say.

Follow TEM on Instagram and Twitter

TEM is produced by Joey Santillo for Pedal Note Media

TEM 97: Mark Rabideau of 21CM on Being Authentic, Remaining Curious and Straying from Traditional Career Paths

Andrew Hitz

Here are the show notes for Episode 97 of The Entrepreneurial Musician Podcast featuring Mark Rabideau of 21CM.

Listen via:

iTunes
SoundCloud
Stitcher

Mark Rabideau, Director of DePauw University's 21CM, joined me for Episode 97 to discuss being authentic, remaining curious and straying from traditional career paths.

Topics Covered:

  • 5:18 - Mark's incredibly interesting and diverse path through the music business and what eventually led him to stray from the traditional path he began on (including leaving a tenured position more than once)

  • 19:53 - How giving close access to great artists through house parties led to him starting a nonprofit with a very narrow focus

  • 23:21 - How doing post-doctoral work at Rutgers University's Center for Creativity completely changed his way of thinking about the arts

  • 24:30 - Mark's trombone quartet, CTQ, which he traveled the world with for 10 years

  • 30:45 - The beginning of 21CM at DePauw University and the many different faces it has today including a monthly online magazine, a semi-annual symposium, an upcoming institute and community outreach

  • 38:25 - How Mark is able to take so many ideas to fruition and ship them rather than have them die just as an idea

  • 46:55 - The book he is finishing right now which is a curriculum for musical entrepreneurship aimed at teaching both the students and the professors

  • 56:00 - The upcoming 21CM Institute which prepares people to teach music entrepreneurship

  • 59:55 - The advice Mark would give to a musician looking to become more entrepreneurial

  • 1:08:12 - Resources he would recommend for a music entrepreneur

Links:

Favorite Quotes:

"I think one of the mistakes we make is we spend a lot of time teaching slide positions and alternate saxophone fingers and we don't really teach them to be creative. We don't really teach them to be collaborative. We don't focus them on chasing down their own curiosities through an education in the arts. So when they leave it they're not hungry for artistic experience."

"If you care about classical music, you don't care about the institutions of the past, you care about the art of the past and making them relevant institutionally today."

"For me there's nothing more frustrating but even more so, dull and boring, than sitting around and talking about wildly creative things and not do anything about it."

"In the real life game of musical chairs, there is a seat for everyone. But you have to actually build that chair."

If you are a fan of the show you can help me reach some specific goals I've set for TEM:

Help me get to 50 ratings and 50 reviews on iTunes. It takes just a minute and really helps people to find the podcast. Thanks to everyone who has already left a rating!

You can also help me get to 20 patrons on Patreons (and I'm really close!) 

Thanks for all the help spreading and supporting TEM. It means the world to me.

Produced by Joey Santillo

TEM 96: Build a Community First (TEM Short)

Andrew Hitz

Listen via:

iTunes
SoundCloud
Stitcher

This TEM Short is in response to my interview with Tim Topham in Episode 95.

Links:

TEM 95: Tim Topham on Building a Community of True Fans in an Already Crowded Space, Launching a Successful Membership Site and Minimum Viable Products
timtopham.com

You can help me reach two specific goals I've set for TEM:

1. Help me get to $50 per episode on Patreon by pledging as little as $1 per episode to support the show:  https://www.patreon.com/tempodcast

2. Help me get to my goal of 50 ratings at iTunes by leaving a rating and review.

And finally, a huge thank you to Parker Mouthpieces for providing the hosting for TEM.

Produced by Joey Santillo

TEM 95: Tim Topham on Building a Community of True Fans in an Already Crowded Space, Launching a Successful Membership Site and Minimum Viable Products

Andrew Hitz

Here are the show notes for Episode 95 of The Entrepreneurial Musician Podcast featuring Tim Topham.

Listen via:

iTunes
SoundCloud
Stitcher

Australian piano teacher and performer Tim Topham shares how, through the use of a membership site, newsletter, podcast, blog and webinars, he was able to build a wildly successful piano teaching community in an already crowded space.

Topics Covered:

  • 7:14 - How Tim ended up getting burned out after college, leaving music altogether for 10 years and how his first piano teacher inspired him upon coming back to music

  • 12:20 - The depressing statistics of how many musicians today make a full-time living performing and why it's important to look at a career in music diversely

  • 14:42 - How he found a niche for himself within the piano teaching world which tends to be very traditional

  • 17:56 - How he organizes his content by theme on a monthly basis based on things teachers are asking him to cover

  • 20:08 - Details about The Inner Circle, the online community of piano teachers he has created on his website, and how it was a concerted effort to scale what he was already regularly doing on a one-on-one basis

  • 25:09 - When he initially launched, how he got his first members to join a paid membership site before there was any kind of community already there

  • 28:34 - The number of hours a week he spends per week on his website and all of his digital services

  • 32:09 - The aspects of his business that he outsources since they aren't his strengths

  • 35:33 - How he went about starting to build his website without a huge amount of technical knowledge

  • 37:59 - The importance of shipping a Minimum Viable Product

  • 40:32 - The "crippling perfection" that classical musicians in particular are used to and how it doesn't help anyone be a successful entrepreneur

  • 44:21 - How he has built a team around him to help with various tasks for his business

  • 49:04 - The advice he has for any musical entrepreneur who is trying to get started (or reach the next level) in the business

  • 57:54 - Resources he recommends to musical entrepreneurs

Links:

Favorite Quotes:

"I've got to stop doing things that one, I'm not good at, and two, isn't bringing value to my members."

"It doesn't really matter where you start. Just start something."

If you are a fan of the show you can help me reach some specific goals I've set for TEM:

Help me get to 50 ratings and 50 reviews on iTunes. It takes just a minute and really helps people to find the podcast. Thanks to everyone who has already left a rating!

You can also help me get to 20 patrons on Patreons (and I'm really close!) 

Thanks for all the help spreading and supporting TEM. It means the world to me.

Produced by Joey Santillo

TEM 94: The Only True Key to Success (and Yes There Is One)

Andrew Hitz

Listen via:

iTunes
SoundCloud
Stitcher

There actually is one true key to success and this is it.

Topics Covered:

1:20 - 95% of the music business makes it incredibly easy to get along with them all of the time but your reputation is based almost entirely on how you deal with the other 5%

3:57 - Why it's so important to hold your tongue (and why that is incredibly true with any kind of written communication which has no tone and usually lacks context)

6:35 - The Gary Vaynerchuck 51/49 Rule

7:50 - The tale of a chamber group who ignored the 51/49 Rule, went for short-term gains above everything else and how it ended (Spoiler Alert: It didn't end well)

11:34 - The best advice I ever received from anyone about getting along with other people

16:21 - The importance of remembering that whatever gig you are playing is always important to the person who hired you, no matter the circumstances of the gig

Links:

TEM 92: Steve Dillon of Dillon Music on Passion, Becoming an Authority and Always Thinking
TEM 1: Ranaan Meyer of Time for Three
The Gary Vee Audio Experience

You can help me reach two specific goals I've set for TEM:

1. Help me get to $50 per episode on Patreon by pledging as little as $1 per episode to support the show:  https://www.patreon.com/tempodcast

2. Help me get to my goal of 50 ratings at iTunes by leaving a rating and review.

And finally, a huge thank you to Parker Mouthpieces for providing the hosting for TEM.

Produced by Joey Santillo

TEM 93: How Passion Leads to Becoming an Authority (TEM Short)

Andrew Hitz

Listen via:

iTunes
SoundCloud
Stitcher

This TEM Short is in response to my interview with Steve Dillon in Episode 92.

How passion can lead to you becoming (and staying) an authority on a subject.

"I think my passion has made me an expert at certain things, thus made me an authority."
—Steve Dillon

Topics Covered:

2:13 - Brian Clark's quote on a simple way to make yourself an authority to most people on anything and how I did that exact same thing a few years ago

5:20 - It turned out that after I did a brief deep dive on marketing that I had a passion for it which has made my continuous research over the last five years happen organically

7:49 - Being an authority on something means you constantly must be consuming new information as the world is always changing

10:06 - One of my passions that I am absolutely an authority on because of years worth of research

Links:

TEM 92: Steve Dillon of Dillon Music on Passion, Becoming an Authority and Always Thinking Long-Term
TEM 82: The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing (Book Report)
Selling More Books Show
Email me at andrew.hitz@gmail.com

You can help me reach two specific goals I've set for TEM:

1. Help me get to $50 per episode on Patreon by pledging as little as $1 per episode to support the show:  https://www.patreon.com/tempodcast

2. Help me get to my goal of 50 ratings at iTunes by leaving a rating and review.

And finally, a huge thank you to Parker Mouthpieces for providing the hosting for TEM.

Produced by Joey Santillo

TEM 92: Steve Dillon of Dillon Music on Passion, Becoming an Authority and Always Thinking Long-Term

Andrew Hitz

Listen via:

iTunes
SoundCloud
Stitcher

Steve Dillon of Dillon Music talking about his 30+ years in the music business. He touches on passion, becoming an authority and the importance of always thinking long-term.

Topics Covered:

5:30 - A summary of Steve's store, Dillon Music

7:23 - The story of how Steve painted a room for his grandmother and when he was in middle school and took that money and bought his first instrument which he immediately traded for two others

11:03 - Steve's lifelong passion for instruments and selling them and how that passion is contagious to anyone he comes into contact with

15:21 - How his passion has helped him become an authority on certain subjects which in turn has helped him to solve problems for people

18:40 - Why trying to monetize the research he's doing to become an expert or the time he spends building relationships with customers is the incorrect way to frame it

23:30 - The keys to why he has done such a great job of hiring people over the years (and why finding a partner to start a small business is the same thing as hiring your 30th employee)

30:45 - What direction he sees things moving on the manufacturing side of the music business

36:08 - How he thought long-term even when he first opened a retail store and was forced to think about short-term things like cash flow (and how that relates to a performer just getting their career off the ground)

47:57 - He talks about the Survey of Music Business course he teaches at New Jersey City University (and why he doesn't spend much time teaching stuff that the students can easily google on their own)

54:30 - Why networking is so vital to success in business (and how so few people are any good at following up with someone they meet in a class or some other professional situation)

57:42 - How Steve was the kid (way before email) that was always calling people asking them questions and how almost all people are looking to help others

Links:

Dillon Music
The E-Myth Revisited by Michael Gerber
Scott Hartman: Episode 48 of The Brass Junkies
How to Win Friends and Influence People by Dale Carnegie 
Think and Grow Rich by Napoleon Hill
Dillon Music Facebook Page

Favorite Quotes:

"My business is my life and my life is my business."

"I think (my passion) has made me become an expert at certain things, thus made me become an authority."

"You have to get out there. You have to be personable and connect with everyone you can."

"When I hire a person I understand that there's gonna be good qualities and bad qualities. My job is to take them both and go to work with it."

"You always have to look long-term unless you're in it for the short-term."

"If you can get along with people, you can succeed."

There are two ways you can support TEM!

You can help me reach two specific goals I've set for TEM:

1. Help me get to $50 per episode on Patreon by pledging as little as $1 per episode to support the show:  https://www.patreon.com/tempodcast

2. Help me get to my goal of 50 ratings at iTunes by leaving a rating and review.

And finally, a huge thank you to Parker Mouthpieces for providing the hosting for TEM.

Produced by Joey Santillo

TEM 91: Cursing Gravity

Andrew Hitz

Listen via:

iTunes
SoundCloud
Stitcher

History is riddled with examples, both inside and outside of the music business, of people fighting reality and it not ending very well.

Topics Covered:

0:20 - The best blog in the world for entrepreneurs
4:54 - Cursing Gravity
5:40 - Some examples from the music business of us collectively "cursing gravity" and why fighting reality never works out

Links:

Seth Godin's Blog
TEM Blog

There are two ways you can support TEM!

You can help me reach two specific goals I've set for TEM:

1. Help me get to $50 per episode on Patreon by pledging as little as $1 per episode to support the show:  https://www.patreon.com/tempodcast

2. Help me get to my goal of 50 ratings at iTunes by leaving a rating and review.

And finally, a huge thank you to Parker Mouthpieces for providing the hosting for TEM.

Produced by Joey Santillo

TEM 90: Networking the Wrong Way

Andrew Hitz

Listen via:

iTunes
SoundCloud
Stitcher

Why it's vitally important to never pitch someone the wrong way and the one thing you have to keep in mind to make sure you're not.

Topics Covered:

3:49 - Signing people up for your newsletter without their permission (and why it is so wrong on so many levels)
8:50 - The emails (including a response to my request to unsubscribe that was nothing short of priceless) I received from someone in the business last week that inspired this episode
13:51 - How to successfully pitch me to be a guest on TEM and why I haven't interviewed a ton of podcasters
16:20 - Why the odds of sending a form letter to someone to pitch them will obviously have an incredibly slim chance of really lining up with that person's needs and a rather special email pitch that Seth Godin once shared about
18:27 - The way to network the wrong way on social media like Instagram and Twitter
23:10 - Why it's vitally important to never pitch anyone the wrong way and the one thing you have to keep in mind to make sure you're not

Links:

The Mockingbird Foundation
Garrett Hope: Episode 57
Jason Heath: Episode 62
Hugh Sung: Episode 54
@TEMPodcast on Instagram and Twitter
@Pray4Jens on Instagram and Twitter

There are two ways you can support TEM!

You can help me reach two specific goals I've set for TEM:

1. Help me get to $25 per episode on Patreon by pledging as little as $1 per episode to support the show:  https://www.patreon.com/tempodcast

2. Help me get to my goal of 50 ratings at iTunes by leaving a rating and review.

And finally, a huge thank you to Parker Mouthpieces for providing the hosting for TEM.

Produced by Joey Santillo

TEM 89 - Book Report: Do The Work by Steven Pressfield

Andrew Hitz

Listen via:

iTunes
SoundCloud
Stitcher

A Book Report on the incredible kick in the pants that is Do The Work by Steven Pressfield. This book will fire you up!

Show Notes:

5:34 - Overview of Do The Work by Steven Pressfield

8:26 - Our Enemies

1. Resistance
2. Rational Thought
3. Friends and Family

13:17 - Our Allies

1. Stay Stupid
2. Stubbornness
3. Blind Faith
4. Passion
5. Assistance (The Opposite of Resistance)
6. Friends and Family

19:32 - The Creative Process Broken Down Into Three Sections

1. Beginning
2. The Middle
3. End

Favorite Quotes from Do The Work:

"A child has no trouble believing the unbelievable, nor does the genius for the madman. It's only you and I, with our big brains and our tiny hearts, who doubt and overthink and hesitate."

"Don't think. Act."

"Start before you're ready. Don't prepare. Begin. Remember, our enemy is not lack of preparation: it's not the difficulty of the project or the state of the market place or the emptiness of our bank account. The enemy has a resistance. The enemy is our chattering brain, which, if we give it so much as a nano second, will start producing excuses, alibis, transparent self-justifications, and 1 million reasons why we can't/shouldn't/won't do what we know we need to do."

"In this book, when I say “Don’t think,” what I mean is: don’t listen to the chatter. Pay no attention to those rambling, disjointed images and notions that drift across the movie screen of your mind. Those are not your thoughts. They are chatter. Chatter is resistance."

"We can never eliminate Resistance. It will never go away. But we can outsmart it, and we can enlist allies that are as powerful as it is."

"Do research early or late. Don’t stop working. Never do research in prime working time."

"Research can be fun. It can be seductive. That’s its danger. We need it, we love it. But we must never forget that research can become Resistance. Soak up what you need to fill in the gaps. Keep working."

"Suspend all self-judgment. Unless you’re building a sailboat or the Taj Mahal, I give you a free pass to screw up as much as you like. The inner critic? His ass is not permitted in the building. Set forth without fear and without self-censorship. When you hear that voice in your head, blow it off. This draft is not being graded. There will be no pop quiz. Only one thing matters in this initial draft: get SOMETHING done, however flawed or imperfect. You are not allowed to judge yourself."

"Let’s talk about the actual process—the writing/composing/ idea generation process. It progresses in two stages: action and reflection. Act, reflect. Act, reflect. NEVER act and reflect at the same time."

"When Michael Crichton approached the end of a novel (so I’ve read), he used to start getting up earlier and earlier in the morning. He was desperate to keep his mojo going. He’d get up at six, then five, then three-thirty and two-thirty, till he was driving his wife insane. Finally he had to move out of the house. He checked into a hotel (the Kona Village, which ain’t so bad) and worked around the clock till he’d finished the book. Michael Crichton was a pro. He knew that Resistance was strongest at the finish. He did what he had to do, no matter how nutty or unorthodox, to finish and be ready to ship."

"Start again (before you are ready!)"

Links:

The War of Art by Steven Pressfield
John Beder: Episode 83
Dana Fonteneau: Episode 85
Ranaan Meyer: Episode 1

There are three ways you can support TEM!

You can help me reach two specific goals I've set for TEM:

1. Help me get to $25 per episode on Patreon by pledging as little as $1 per episode to support the show:  https://www.patreon.com/tempodcast

2. Help me get to my goal of 50 ratings at iTunes by leaving a rating and review.

And finally, a huge thank you to Parker Mouthpieces for providing the hosting for TEM.

Produced by Joey Santillo

TEM 88: Arnold Palmer Luck (TEM Short)

Andrew Hitz

Listen via:

iTunes
SoundCloud
Stitcher

This TEM Short is in response to my interview with Peter Meechan in Episode 87.

How "Arnold Palmer Luck" can help propel any career forward.

Links:

It would mean the world to me if you felt like making a small donation to support what I'm doing with TEM. You can find out more at:

https://www.patreon.com/tempodcast

Produced by Joey Santillo

Are You Willing to Hear the Word No 2,994 Times?

Andrew Hitz

TEM 87: Peter Meechan on Controlling Your Own Career, Unintentional Networking and Finding Your Niche in the Music Business

Andrew Hitz

Here are the show notes for Episode 87 of The Entrepreneurial Musician Podcast featuring Peter Meechan.

Listen via:

iTunes
SoundCloud
Stitcher

Peter Meechan is a professional composer from England who now resides in Canada. He has had compositions performed by the "President's Own" Marine Band, Edmonton Symphony, Black Dyke Brass Band and many other world class ensembles.

Topics Covered:

  • 5:32 - Pete's indirect journey through music and how he came to become a professional composer
  • 10:42 - How a bar at his university led to some incredibly effective (and unintentional) networking that still pays off for him
  • 18:30 - The great story of how saying yes led to him cold-calling one of the most famous trumpet players in the world, Rex Richardson, which in turn led to a commission
  • 26:43 - How he has come to find his niche as a composer of brass music (in spite of not being a brass player himself) and why it's important to intentionally pursue things within the business that people are actually paying for
  • 37:52 - How many artists have a hangup about marketing their art and why they shouldn't (at least you shouldn't if you're genuine)
  • 45:15 - How we all know colleagues who suck at social media and it can be a turnoff about it in general (but that it shouldn't be) and how the world is still very young in the entire social media experience and how we're still figuring it all out
  • 54:48 - Why he chose to self-publish his music rather than go the traditional publisher route (Spoiler: the old business model made absolutely no sense for him as a composer) and about a traditional publisher he heard about recently that is offering much better terms for composers moving forward
  • 1:03:57 - The importance of controlling your own career and making your own destiny (and why that's a little daunting)
  • 1:09:50 - Why the resource he recommends to all aspiring entrepreneurial musicians he speaking to everyone who is doing what you're doing

Links:

Favorite Quotes:

  • "Humans, as a whole, we're very good at spotting someone who is full of it. The guy who's talking BS. We instinctively pick up on it...And equally we pick up on someone who is incredibly genuine and someone who is incredibly passionate. We don't sit there and think about it. It's just an instinct. And I think the whole making people believe in you and what you do has a whole lot to do with that as well."

Help me get to my $25 per episode goal on Patreon and get a mini-consultation with me!

And you can help me get to 50 ratings on iTunes. Thanks to everyone who has already left a rating!

Thanks for all the help spreading and supporting TEM. It means the world to me.

Produced by Joey Santillo

Start Before You Are Ready

Andrew Hitz

Did you know you can now follow TEM on Instagram? The handle is @TEMPodcast (same as Twitter.)

Here's a short Instagram video I made about my favorite quote from the wonderful Steven Pressfield book, "Do the Work", which is the subject of my next TEM Book Report.

Show Notes for Episode 86: "TEM Short: Beware the External Should's"

Andrew Hitz

Listen via:

iTunes
SoundCloud
Stitcher

This TEM Short is in response to my interview with Dana Fonteneau in Episode 85.

Are "external should's" holding you and your art back?

Topics Covered:

  • 1:35 - Why the word should is dangerous (and easier to spot in other people)
  • 5:27 - The example of my good friend and colleague Joanna Hersey and how she went against a strong "external should" and has thrived
  • 7:56 - An example mentioned previously by David Cutler about a "should" that steers an entire corner of the our industry
  • 10:34 - A good strategy to battle "should's"

Links:

It would mean the world to me if you felt like making a small donation to support what I'm doing with TEM. You can find out more at:

https://www.patreon.com/tempodcast

Produced by Joey Santillo

TEM 85: Dana Fonteneau on Figuring out Your "Why", Holding Yourself Accountable When You Work for Yourself and How She Got Her First Paid Clients Before She Had a Proven Track Record

Andrew Hitz

Listen via:

iTunes
SoundCloud
Stitcher

Dana Fonteneau, the woman behind the WholeHearted Musician and the author of It's Not (JUST) About the Gig: A Musician's Guide to Creating the Mindset Which Leads to Career Success and Fulfillment, speaks about getting to know your why and how that informs everything you do as an entrepreneur.

Topics Covered:

  • 5:54 - Dana's journey from chamber musician to licensed psychotherapist, mindset coach and consultant
  • 10:43 - What exactly is The WholeHearted Musician and how she chose to structure it and what to offer (and how that's morphed over the years)
  • 15:07 How she got her first consulting clients before she had a proven track record (and how that relates to her most effective marketing tool today)
  • 21:38 Why her book is "backwards" compared to a lot of entrepreneur classes in that it first makes you ask questions of yourself to figure out your why before starting with the how like resumes and websites
  • 29:57 - An example of someone who "made it" in the music business at an early age and was miserable because he spent no time envisioning what traditional success was going to look like
  • 32:49 - Holding yourself accountable and how all entrepreneurs can struggle with that (and the formula she uses today to hold herself accountable)
  • 42:30 - How getting to the bottom of your "why" specifically relates to being an entrepreneur

Links:

Favorite Quotes:

  • "Nobody wanted to hear it because I was just screaming about what I thought people needed and not really addressing their needs."

  • "I still think that face-to-face connection is essential to building trust in a relationship. That's probably my most effective marketing tool."

  • "We have these external models or we have these external should's that say 'This is the only way you're going to do it and if you don't do it this way you're a failure' and nobody stops to questions 'What is success for me? What would I love to do and what do I need to do it?' So in a way I think we're asking all the wrong questions."

  • "To know ourselves is our greatest resource."

  • "It's really about failing over and over and over again and saying 'Thank you for the failing. Thank you for the learning. Thank you for the course correction.'"

  • "When you have an inspired purpose, success is a byproduct."

Help me get to my $25 per episode goal on Patreon and get a mini-consultation with me!

And you can help me get to 50 ratings on iTunes. Thanks to everyone who has already left a rating!

Thanks for all the help spreading and supporting TEM. It means the world to me.

Produced by Joey Santillo