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TEM Blog

The Entrepreneurial Musician Blog by Andrew Hitz featuring articles on being an entrepreneur in the music business. Show notes for The Entrepreneurial Musician Podcast.

Filtering by Tag: Tuba

TEM136: Deanna Swoboda Quotes

Andrew Hitz

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TEM136: Deanna Swoboda Quotes

This episode features thoughts on my favorite quotes from the conversation I had with Deanna Swoboda in TEM135.Quotes:

  • "I had designed a program, an assembly program, that could be turned into something that people would be interested in having at their schools. It was a program that music stores and music dealers were interested in collaborating with in terms of recruitment. Sam Pilafian really pushed me to organize that program into a business."
  • "Working in a nonprofit organization gave me skills, business skills…how to organize my thoughts of forming a business, and how to market, and how to plan, and how to organize."
  • "I think as musicians, sometimes we think about success, what success means to us individually. We really think it should be from point A to point B, and it should be very clean. In reality, it's the zig and the zag…the roads less traveled that you decide to take that have a direct influence upon your career."
  • "Really, at the heart of entrepreneurship is opportunity recognition. I think a lot of people may attribute their career to fate or destiny, being in the right place at the right time, et cetera, getting discovered or something, getting lucky. There is something to this. But I think that's a little bit of a passive approach. I really believe that it is that combination of talent, hard work, your work ethic, your attitude, and your determination and perseverance, and recognizing opportunities when they come your way."
  • "It's so important to be honest with yourself about what is truly going to make you happy. I think that it can change throughout life."
  • "Speaking of failures, I've had so many failures during my career. Without failures, there wouldn't have been self-improvement and moving into what's next. How do I do this slightly different so that it works, and it's a success."
  • "Everything leads to something else. Every person that you meet knows somebody else who might have an idea for you or be interested in what it is that you have to offer. Everyone and every one of their friends is a potential customer."
  • "You also have to communicate what makes you distinctive, and what makes your thing distinctive, and how you set yourself apart."

Show notes for all episodes of TEM including topics discussed, links to all books and websites referenced can be found at:

http://www.andrewhitz.com/shownotes

1. Help me get to my goal of $50 per episode on Patreon (only $8 to go!) by pledging as little as $1 per episode to support the show: https://www.patreon.com/tempodcast.

2. I am ONE REVIEW SHY of my next goal of 75 ratings on iTunes. Who is going to help me out by taking just a couple of minutes on iTunes and then emailing me to tell me they were the 75th person?

And finally, a huge thank you to Parker Mouthpieces for providing the hosting for TEM.

Produced by Andrew Hitz

TEM135: Developing an Idea into a Product You Can Build a Business Around - A Conversation with Deanna Swoboda

Andrew Hitz

Listen via:

iTunes
Spotify
SoundCloud
Stitcher

TEM135: Developing an Idea into a Product You Can Build a Business Around - A Conversation with Deanna Swoboda

Deanna Swoboda is the creator of Brass Rap, a school assembly program so successful she had no place to live for two full years because she was on the road so much! She is also the Assistant Professor of Tuba and Euphonium at Arizona State University where she also teaches music business and product development classes.

What You'll Learn:

  • How a mentor pushed her to turn a school assembly program into a business
  • What she learned from working for a nonprofit arts organization and how she applied that to working for herself in the music business
  • How success is almost never the straight line from Point A to Point B that we expect
  • Why you aren’t a failure if you are doing multiple things in order to make money
  • Why what a lot of people attribute to luck is actually opportunity recognition
  • The questions you need to ask yourself to help define success for you
  • The importance of quantifying exactly what it is that will make you happy (and why that is a moving target)
  • Why failing is integral to moving you into whatever’s next
  • How the school assembly show she booked up to 250 days a year for 10 straight years was made into a refined product through very intentional research and development
  • Why sometimes “opportunity recognition” is being prepared to rap for a company president on the spot
  • The importance of cultivating a good attitude

Links:

Show notes for all episodes of TEM including topics discussed and links to all books and websites referenced can be found at:

http://www.andrewhitz.com/shownotes

1. Help me get to my goal of $50 per episode on Patreon (only $8 to go!) by pledging as little as $1 per episode to support the show: https://www.patreon.com/tempodcast.

2. I need only TWO PEOPLE to go leave a rating and review on iTunes to make my next goal. Will you be one of the two to help me out?

And finally, a huge thank you to Parker Mouthpieces for providing the hosting for TEM.

Produced by Andrew Hitz

TEM 52: Sam Pilafian of Boston Brass on the legacy of Prince, Developing your voice on stage and becoming an "overnight success" after 20 years of work (Part 2)

Andrew Hitz

Listen via:

iTunes
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Here is Part 2 of my incredible conversation with Sam Pilafian of Boston Brass.

Topics Covered:

  • Sam's thoughts on the passing of Prince and the hilarious story of when Empire Brass ran into him while waiting for an elevator
  • How Prince was able to surround himself with the best musicians in the business
  • How preparing to become the first brass quintet to ever win the Naumberg chamber competition helped to shape empire brass
  • The importance of developing your voice (either as a group or an individual) on stage
  • How winning the 1976 Naumberg Chamber Music Award led to a contract with Columbia Artist Management, which in turn led to some of the members quitting gigs like the Boston Symphony to go all in
  • How good the powers that be at Columbia Artist Management were at "creating careers" and how they helped to steer the Empire Brass brand and sound
  • The connection that's made with an audience when every member of a chamber group is individually developed and the audience gets to know them
  • How some groups become "overnight successes" after 20 years of work
  • How great a group plays live after they make a recording
  • How valuable having string playing coaches was for the group
  • How they modeled their sound after the Borodin Quartet
  • How a banjo player he played with over a decade earlier in Your Father's Mustache led to him playing on Pink Floyd's The Wall
  • How the Empire Brass Seminar at Tanglewood enabled them to network with the next generation of great brass players
  • The importance of developing your own repertoire
  • How Empire Brass became so popular in Japan
  • How he has found himself in a number of "second careers" like developing The Breathing Gym and producing
  • The brand new Boston Brass album, Reminiscing, which was inspired by the late, great Rolf Smedvig

Links:

Favorite Quote:

  • "If you work that hard, you can come up with (Pink Floyd's The Wall). That was good math. I needed to see that. No corner-cutting. No gifts. These guys did it uphill the whole freaking way until they were happy with it. And no settling."
  • "We used to have a saying that 'every night's Yankees Stadium.' We'd be in Devils Lake, North Dakota having a big fight about how something should release after the concert. That was always a good sign to tell you the truth."

Want to help "keep the lights on" and make future episodes of TEM possible? Please visit our Patreon page to see how you can help: 

https://www.patreon.com/tempodcast

Produced by Austin Boyer of FredBrass