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TEM Blog

The Entrepreneurial Musician Blog by Andrew Hitz featuring articles on being an entrepreneur in the music business. Show notes for The Entrepreneurial Musician Podcast.

Filtering by Tag: Cathy Heller

TEM189: Dale Trumbore Quotes

Andrew Hitz

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TEM189: Dale Trumbore Quotes

This episode of TEM features my favorite quotes from my conversation with composer Dale Trumbore in TEM144.

Quotes:

  • “My idea of success as I defined it as I was 18 was ‘I will know I am successful when I am making my living as a composer’ and that’s shifted over the years as I mentioned before. I have eight piano students. I’m happy to have them. I’m happy to have a source of steady income.”

  • “I love having the morning to do business things and the afternoon to do creative things. Again, that’s what works for me. I know everyone’s different. But once you find your own personal creative rhythm you should do everything in your power to make that possible and to create and carve out that space for yourself.”

  • “That particular essay is also about not getting so attached to particular performers. Like, ‘oh if this one chorus just did my music I would feel like I made it. I’d feel like I was finally successful. I’d get a ton more commissions as a result. That might be true, but looking at my career, and looking at my friends’ careers too, it is very rare that one single performance has that kind of effect.”

  • “Feeling like you have any obligation to put anything on your website is a recipe for disaster I think. It’s up to you completely how you structure your website and what you put on it and why.”

  • "You do all this research and it might take five minutes. You don't have to dig deep into the history of what this ensemble has done. But you get a really good feeling for the kind of music that they do and then you look at your own catalog and you see what music you have that would be a good fit for them. An actual, real good fit. And then you say something like 'I think this piece would be a really good fit for you because I've noticed that you loved doing this piece' or 'you did a really beautiful performance of this piece and so I thought you might enjoy my piece."

  • "I've found too that just labeling things when they come up is so helpful. Recognizing that something is a pattern and that it comes up every time and knowing that you can be like 'Oh, this is the day where I hate everything I've written and tomorrow or two days later it's gonna be fine again.' That helps you move through it, again, without attaching any additional stress or anxiety to that moment."

  • "It's okay if things take time and they will take time. And if you set a very, very narrow, specific goal for yourself you're not very likely to succeed."

Links:

Want to help the show? Here's a couple of ways you can do that!

1. Help me get to my next goal of $100 per episode on Patreon by pledging as little as $1 per episode to support the show: https://www.patreon.com/tempodcast.

2. My next Apple Podcasts goal is 150 ratings and 75 reviews. Take just a minute to leave a rating and review on Apple Podcasts to help me get there. Thank you!

And finally, a huge thank you to Parker Mouthpieces for providing the hosting for TEM.

Produced by Andrew Hitz

Show notes for all episodes of TEM including topics discussed, links to all books and websites referenced can be found at:

http://www.andrewhitz.com/shownotes

TEM127: Cathy Heller Quotes (TEM Short)

Andrew Hitz

Listen via:

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My conversation with singer/songwriter Cathy Heller in TEM126 was easily one of my favorites out of the many TEM interviews I've done over the last three years. She is an incredible businesswoman and shared a ton of insights into how she's navigated being a human throughout her career and her life.

It was hard narrowing down the quotes for this one!

Quotes:

  • "I realized this whole getting a record deal thing, it's like meeting the Wizard of Oz. It doesn't necessarily mean you're going to get what you need. At that point, I was able to see the way deals were structured and how, even if the deal would've gone all the way and the record would've gotten made, the odds of me making any money or the odds of me even having any say in the material or any ... It's like it's so once-in-a-lifetime that that actually works out that way.”
  • "It was like two years of that, and I remember one day driving down the street, and I started to cry. I was crying so hard, and the sunblock was mixed with the tears. I started laughing because I couldn't see. The sunblock was in my eyes. I was like, 'I have to pull over. I can't see.' I decided then and there this cannot work. If I'm going to try to be something that I'm not, and I'm not aligned with what I really feel, I'm going to be depressed. If I'm depressed, then even if people are telling me it's the most practical thing in the world to get a job job, it's totally impractical because I'm miserable.”
  • "If you try one approach, and it doesn't work, then you must try another approach. People will say all the time ... I meet artists all the time, all kinds of artists in Los Angeles. I meet screen writers, I meet actors, I meet voiceover artists, I meet songwriters, and they're all saying things like, 'Well, I think I tried everything.' But you didn't. You tried one way, and it didn't work. What about the 14 other ways that you can try, and then the other 14 ways you can try if that doesn't work?"
  • "I'm sort of on a mission now to help every person I possibly can meet to get clear about what they really want to do in this world, and then hopefully give them some inspiration with some real strategies of how to be a better problem-solver and get to do their life's work. I think that the opposite of depression is purpose, and I think that people, if they're doing what makes them happy and they get to make a living doing it, which means they then get to do it all the time, I think people feel they're happier and they're contributing. I think that might be the best way to change the world, because we've no control over all these other crazy factors and things that are going on right now.”
  • "I have so many artists who come to me, and they're like, 'I can't, because I don't know anybody in the music business.' Then they just let that thought stop them from taking any action, or they'll say, 'I can't because I'm not a producer, and I can't produce my own music. I can't afford a producer.' Okay, did you try going onto Facebook and looking at all of the groups of all of the recent alumni from Belmont and Berkelee and just reach out to any one of those people with enthusiasm and say, 'I would love to create this. Do you want to work with me? Might you find one human being who's willing to do it and get some money on the backend? Be resourceful.”
  • "I want people to get that if you want to make a living, you have to make something that somebody else needs, that somebody else wants. You'll never get to page three, you'll never get to episode four, you'll never get through the first verse, if you're constantly criticizing yourself. You'll never get to page three, you'll never get to episode four, you'll never get through the first verse if you're constantly criticizing yourself.”
  • “What I tell artists, this is like a cool trick for songwriters, I tell songwriters to open up a Google Doc, and, when they come up with an idea for a song, I tell them to just spend an hour and don't edit. Just spend a full hour. Put everything in that Google Doc that you could possibly think of that might go into the song. Did you come up with a word? Is there a phrase? Is there a lyric idea? Do you have story that happened when you were three that you might want to call upon and reference somehow in the song? Just put it all in there like you're throwing everything into a big pot, and don't edit yourself. Give yourself a whole fricking hour to just be a free person just playing and flexing the muscle because when you let yourself play, this magic happens where new things come in because you're not constantly trying to filter.”
  • "I heard Ed Sheeran say it really well. He said, 'If you walk into your vacation cabin up in Maine. You haven't been there for a few months. You turn on the water. It might run brown for a little bit, right? Then you leave the water on, and it starts to run clearer and clearer, and then it's fine. It's totally drinkable, and you have good water. You have to let that water run.' He said, 'When you're songwriting, when you're making anything that you're making, you have to let the water run through.' We talked about this in the beginning of the show. You have to be willing to tolerate the fact that it might be uncomfortable. It might not be perfect. It might not be right away the most beautiful thing you've ever created.”

Show notes for all episodes of TEM including topics discussed, links to all books and websites referenced can be found at:

http://www.andrewhitz.com/shownotes

1. Help me get to my goal of $50 per episode on Patreon by pledging as little as $1 per episode to support the show: https://www.patreon.com/tempodcast.

2. I'm up to 60 ratings and 41 reviews on iTunes. Help me reach my goals of 75 ratings and 50 reviews by taking just a couple of minutes on iTunes!

And finally, a huge thank you to Parker Mouthpieces for providing the hosting for TEM.

Produced by Andrew Hitz

TEM126: Cathy Heller on Getting a Major Record Deal Yet Still Failing, Being Analytical About Your Approach to the Music Business and Persevering Until You Close the Gap

Andrew Hitz

Listen via:

iTunes
Spotify
SoundCloud
Stitcher

Oh man is this a good one! Cathy Heller is just one of those incredibly uplifting people who always makes you feel better after to speak with them. I just love hearing someone who has had such a huge amount of success in our business who is also so grounded on a human level. Those are the people I try to emulate.

From the Show Notes:

TEM126: Cathy Heller of the Don't Keep Your Day Job Podcast on Getting a Major Record Deal Yet Still Failing, Being Analytical About Your Approach to the Music Business and Persevering Until You Close the Gap

Cathy Heller is a hugely successful singer-songwriter, the owner of Catch the Moon Music and the mother of three children under the age of six (!) living in LA.

What You'll Learn:

  • How getting two different major record deals in LA still didn’t lead to any commercial success for Cathy
  • How cycling through “real” jobs for two years helped her realize that she had to be true to herself and make music for a living
  • The very thorough research method she used to get her songs successfully placed on television and film
  • The various things she offers today including her own agency, an online course and a podcast “Don’t Keep Your Day Job” which is all about reverse-engineering your dream job (which led to a book deal with a major publisher)
  • Why intentionally writing for commercial success is not selling out
  • How the key to commercial success in business is making something that someone else wants
  • Why self-perception is such a powerful thing and can easily derail even the most successful person
  • How ever though a stadium full of people listen to each episode of her podcast, she really is only talking to one person at a time
  • A songwriting exercise she does to help get ideas out (which is applicable to anyone doing anything)
  • The importance of sticking with something until you can close “the gap”

Links:

Show notes for all episodes of TEM including topics discussed, links to all books and websites referenced can be found at:

http://www.andrewhitz.com/shownotes

1. Help me get to my goal of $50 per episode on Patreon by pledging as little as $1 per episode to support the show: https://www.patreon.com/tempodcast.

2. Thanks to everyone who helped me get to my goal of 50 ratings on iTunes! I appreciate it very much!

And finally, a huge thank you to Parker Mouthpieces for providing the hosting for TEM.

Produced by Andrew Hitz