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TEM Blog

The Entrepreneurial Musician Blog by Andrew Hitz featuring articles on being an entrepreneur in the music business. Show notes for The Entrepreneurial Musician Podcast.

Filtering by Tag: Bass

TEM124: Ranaan Meyer of Time For Three on Advice for Young Musicians, Seizing Opportunities and Why You Have to Dream Big (TEM Rewind)

Andrew Hitz

Listen via:

iTunes
Spotify
SoundCloud
Stitcher

TEM124: Ranaan Meyer of Time For Three on Advice for Young Musicians, Seizing Opportunities and Why You Have to Dream Big (TEM Rewind)

Ranaan Meyer is a bass player and founding member of Time for Three, one of the busiest chamber ensembles in the world.

TEM Rewind is a new format that will appear sporadically throughout 2018. Some of my favorite interviews were in the very early days of TEM, before many of you were following the show.

This conversation with Ranaan is from the very first episode way back in 2015 and is absolute gold.

What You'll Learn:

  • Why all it took was one band member who really believed in the band and was willing to bankroll it to get them on the road to success
  • How from day one they refused to play background music and never performed for anything less than $1500
  • How even as college students Time for Three was very serious and methodical about who they networked with and how
  • Why once you get people to take ownership of your product they then do the selling for you
  • Why you need to be set up correctly and know the right questions to ask before you potentially waste a lot of time and money showcasing at something like APAP
  • The difference between booking yourself through the commercial market versus the presenting arts market
  • The three words that Ranaan writes in bold at the top of every To Do list he ever makes
  • How a power outage before a Philadelphia Orchestra concert led to Ranaan wowing 5,000 audience members and the entire Philly Orchestra before Time for Three was even a thing
  • The importance of dreaming big because it just might happen if you do
  • Why it’s imperative to try get to a place in your career where you can delegate some tasks

Show notes for all episodes of TEM including topics discussed, links to all books and websites referenced can be found at:

http://www.andrewhitz.com/shownotes

1. Help me get to my goal of $50 per episode on Patreon by pledging as little as $1 per episode to support the show: https://www.patreon.com/tempodcast.

2. Thanks to everyone who helped me get to my goal of 50 ratings on iTunes! I appreciate it very much!

And finally, a huge thank you to Parker Mouthpieces for providing the hosting for TEM.

Produced by Andrew Hitz

TEM106: Corey Brown Quotes (TEM Short)

Andrew Hitz

Listen via:

iTunes
Spotify
SoundCloud
Stitcher

Corey Brown is the founder of the online bass magazine, No Treble, and worked with Seth Godin to build Squidoo, one of the most visited websites in the history of the internet.

This TEM Short features thoughts on my favorite Corey Brown quotes from TEM 105.

Quotes:

  • "We spent the summer (and) Seth's goal was to prototype (the website.) I don't know why but the team couldn't really pull together a prototype. So I said 'Well this is really too complicated of an idea to just jump into protyping. This thing has to be architected. That's a skillset he didn't bring me in for but it's a skillset I had."
  • "I'm inherently lazy. People don't think of me that way but I look for efficiencies in everything. If we're doing the same thing twice, I'm like 'Okay how do make this so we don't do this twice?'"
  • "I didn't see an online magazine for bass players, and there weren't that many of them anyway, but I didn't see one where I thought 'This is what I would want to build'. This was the opportunity to say 'This is the online magazine I think needs to exist and we'll see what happens and we'll see if people agree with me or not."
  • "In my mind, if you see an opportunity to connect with someone, you should just go for it."

Show notes for all episodes of TEM including topics discussed, links to all books and websites referenced can be found at:

http://www.andrewhitz.com/shownotes

1. Help me get to my goal of $50 per episode on Patreon by pledging as little as $1 per episode to support the show: https://www.patreon.com/tempodcast.

2. Help me get to my goal of 50 ratings at iTunes by leaving a rating and review.

And finally, a huge thank you to Parker Mouthpieces for providing the hosting for TEM.

Produced by Joey Santillo

TEM105: Corey Brown of No Treble on Working with Seth Godin, Having the Courage to Reach Out to People You Want to Meet and Launching the World's Top Online Bass Magazine

Andrew Hitz

Corey Brown 1.jpeg

TEM105: Corey Brown of No Treble on Working with Seth Godin, Having the Courage to Reach Out to People You Want to Meet and Launching the World's Top Online Bass Magazine

Corey Brown is the founder of the online bass magazine, No Treble, and worked with Seth Godin to build Squidoo, one of the most visited websites in the history of the internet.

What You'll Learn:

  • How Corey fell in love with music and ended up majoring in music at North Texas
  • How not thriving within the formal structure of college pushed him towards one of his other loves, graphic design
  • How he ended up working with Seth Godin to run Squidoo, one of the most frequently visited websites in the world, when they didn't know each other beforehand
  • The importance of architecting a website when building it so you have a clear idea of how it is all going to function together
  • How he launched No Treble so he would have something waiting for him whenever his run at Squidoo ended
  • Why he worried entirely about content and traffic and not about monetization (and the parallels there with launching a podcast)
  • How he's monetized No Treble after the fact
  • How every time they hit a traffic benchmark at Squidoo Seth Godin challenged them to add a zero as their next goal
  • How he came to be in charge of the official Jaco Pastorius website (and why when given the chance to connect with someone you should just reach out)

Links:

Show notes for all episodes of TEM including topics discussed, links to all books and websites referenced can be found at:

http://www.andrewhitz.com/shownotes

Don't miss the debut of the TEM Newsletter! Sign up to receive a free copy of 7 Things I Learned from the First 100 Episodes of TEM.

1. Help me get to my goal of $50 per episode on Patreon by pledging as little as $1 per episode to support the show: https://www.patreon.com/tempodcast.

2. Help me get to my goal of 50 ratings at iTunes (I'm two away!) by leaving a rating and review.

Follow TEM on Instagram and Twitter and Facebook

And finally, a huge thank you to Parker Mouthpieces for providing the hosting for TEM.

Produced by Joey Santillo for Pedal Note Media

TEM 79: Emilio Guarino on Action Steps, the Constant of Change and the Challenges of Self-Publication

Andrew Hitz

Listen via:

iTunes
SoundCloud
Stitcher

Topics Covered:

  • What inspired him to write his first book, "Make It: A Guide For Recent Music Graduates"
  • How 90% of the book is based on personal experiences beginning with graduate school (when he was first on his own financially)
  • The in my opinion awesome fact that every chapter of his book ends with "Action Steps" for the reader to take (I wish more books like this did that!)
  • How your body is going to make a routine for yourself whether you set one or not
  • The incredible percentage of any given day which is just comprised of habit
  • How he keeps a daily journal of all of his thoughts throughout the day and when he goes back and reads them he tries to translate them into actions he can take
  • The importance of blocking out time for something important each and every day where he tells the world to go away and just focuses on that task
  • Change is the only constant
  • The Gig Triangle (the metric I use to decide whether I am going to say yes to something today)
  • Why if you have no entrepreneurial experience, designing and selling a sticker for a project (like a band you're in) will teach you a lot about business
  • The many things (like a book mockup) you have to do when you self-publish
  • What he would do differently if he publishes a second book
  • The importance of customers finding your product in the channels they're already hanging out in

Links:

Favorite Quotes:

  • "Use routine to your advantage. Set small, daily goals that are realistically achievable for you that inch you toward your desired outcome."
  • "I think the master habit that you need to get in place is the habit of reviewing your habits."
  • "I wouldn't recommend writing a book for money. There are better ways to go about that."

Show notes for all episodes of TEM including links to all books and websites referenced in this episode can be found at:

http://www.andrewhitz.com/shownotes

It would mean the world to me if you felt like making a small donation to support what I'm doing with TEM. You can find out more at:

https://www.patreon.com/tempodcast

Produced by Joey Santillo

TEM 62: Jason Heath of the Contrabass Conversations Podcast on Finding Your Voice, Executing on a Great Idea and His Advice on Starting a Podcast

Andrew Hitz

Listen via:

iTunes
SoundCloud
Stitcher

Jason Heath is a professional bass player, a very successful podcaster, one of the most read bloggers in the classical music world and teacher.

Topics Covered:

  • How he had a rather sudden realization when he was a graduate student that he needed to figure out how to make money and what actions he took to make that happen
  • How he was able to find his voice and exact target audience when he first started blogging
  • The combination of finding a good idea and then doing the work over an extended period of time
  • How Jason no longer caring what people thought led to him creating more personal content which made his blog really take off
  • Why the notion that you must have a very specific voice in order for a blog to be successful may not be true all of the time
  • How Jason's reach through the blog and podcast led to 56 bass players auditioning at DePaul his first year of teaching there
  • His advice about starting a podcast
  • How having an interview-based podcast has many benefits including making you a better listener and networking
  • How hosting a podcast in the arts is still a blue ocean
  • How to repurpose your content for new content
  • How long it takes for Jason to fully produce a one-hour episode of Contrabass Conversations
  • Why regularity of content is so important for a podcast but how you have multiple options for when to schedule episodes
  • The equipment Jason uses to produce his podcast

Links:

Favorite Quotes:

  • "In your 20's and 30's you obsess about what everyone thinks about you. In your 40's and 50's you realize they aren't thinking about you as much as you think they are. In your 60's and 70's you figure out they were never thinking about you in the first place."
  • "The best possible time to start a podcast is five years ago. The second best time is right now."
  • "Done is better than good."

You can help offset the ongoing costs of producing the show by making a small donation at http://www.pedalnotemedia.com/support-the-entrepreneurial-musician. Your support is greatly appreciated!

Produced by Joey Santillo

TEM 57: Lauren Pierce on Building a Popular YouTube Channel, Knowing When to Quit and Teaching Herself How to Code

Andrew Hitz

Listen via:

iTunes
SoundCloud
Stitcher

TEM 57: Lauren Pierce on Building a Popular YouTube Channel, Knowing When to Quit and Teaching Herself How to Code

Lauren Pierce is a professional bass player, teacher and entrepreneur.

Topics Covered:

  • How she went from only being accepted to one music school to being a professional bass player
  • Why she changed course multiple times before she even finished school
  • How isolation after school and a lack of anyone to perform for inspired her to start her incredibly popular YouTube Channel
  • How she always jumps in head first whenever she tackles any new project
  • What she learned by having a less-than-ideal first video shoot
  • How she went from being terrified of video editing to loving it
  • How you don't know what you don't know when you are first embarking on a new task
  • How her online content directly led to her getting an agent
  • How she built her Skype lesson studio
  • What went into deciding to go with a membership-based model for online lessons
  • Why she joined Codecademy and learned how to code
  • Being willing to email Wordpress support 10x a day until she understood everything
  • How all failures are a learning opportunity
  • When to quit and when not to quit
  • How she prioritizes things

Links:

Favorite Quote:

"The work never stops. You just get better at opening those doors."

Want to help "keep the lights on" and make future episodes of TEM possible? Please visit our Patreon page to see how you can help:

https://www.patreon.com/tempodcast

Produced by Austin Boyer of FredBrass

TEM1: Ranaan Meyer of Time for Three on Advice for Young Musicians, the Importance of a Strong Support Network and Founding Time for Three

Andrew Hitz

Listen via:

Ranaan Meyer is the bass player for Time For Three, a teacher, and the founder of the Time For Three Foundation.

What You'll Learn:

  • How Time for Three started almost by accident and how the got (more like created) their big break
  • The business model Time for Three uses that continues to see them thrive
  • What's next for the group
  • The advice Ranaan has for young musicians trying to make a name for themselves in the business today
  • The importance of having a strong support network (Ranaan leans on his heavily)
  • The three words that are written in block leaders daily at the top of his To-Do list
  • How he and his colleague Zach DePue took advantage of a power outage while playing with the Philadelphia Orchestra and proceeded to wow the crowd, amaze the rest of the orchestra and how it helped propel them to stardom
  • The nonprofit he runs and his other entrepreneurial ventures he runs including two bass camps and his career as a soloist

Show notes for all episodes of TEM including topics discussed, links to all books and websites referenced can be found at:

http://www.andrewhitz.com/shownotes

Want to help "keep the lights on" and make future episodes of TEM possible? Please visit our Patreon page to see how you can help: 

https://www.patreon.com/tempodcast

Produced by Austin Boyer and Buddy Deshler of FredBrass