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TEM Blog

The Entrepreneurial Musician Blog by Andrew Hitz featuring articles on being an entrepreneur in the music business. Show notes for The Entrepreneurial Musician Podcast.

A truth bomb from Henry Winkler

Andrew Hitz

Tenacity + Courage + Honesty About Your Ability + Gratitude = Accomplishing What's On Your Mind

 

Oh man if I were the tattoo type and I was looking for a really long tattoo this would be a good candidate! I love how one good quote can fire me the hell up!

(You can listen to the entire Henry Winkler interview with James Altucher from which that quote is taken plus read a summary of the best points he makes here.)

TEM152: David Taylor Quotes

Andrew Hitz

David Taylor 1.jpeg

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TEM152: David Taylor Quotes

This episode features thoughts on my favorite quotes from the conversation I had with David Taylor in TEM137: How "Overnight Success” David Taylor Was Named to the 2018 Forbes 30 Under 30 Europe List by Working 70-Hour Weeks for Years.

Quotes:

  • “I cut myself some slack in regards to it. That's why at the beginning I thought, ‘I need to be an expert at everything and I need to make sure I'm infused by everything’ and I'm (now) aware that I'm not going to be totally passionate about every single element of the business.”
  • “I totally agree about sort of giving someone a leash to run. I've really had the most amazing orchestra manager intern this summer. We have this whole job description. You do librarian duties, all this stuff, and then we made the decision to go completely digital and use iPads, so her whole job description changed. Then all the staff meet for the first time on the course as well so it was jumping straight into the fire and she just absolutely smashed it. So I'd go to ask how things were going and she'd already thought of all the problems that were coming up, already fixed them all and had already solved them without me having to worry about anything. When it works well, it's an absolute dream. Once you meet people you get on with creatively and you respect I think it makes it much easier to do the navigating side of things.”
  • “This is the most amazing time for anyone to create any business or do anything to improve themselves. In the past, let's say even 20 years ago, I'd not be able to do this. Before, you'd have to go to a library and go and talk to the clerk and work out what books you might want and go and find them. Read the back of them. Make the choice which one you want to take home. Take it home. Read it. Find out it's not good. Come back. Even after three weeks you only learn one thing. Whereas now at your fingertips you can find a YouTube tutorial or a blog that someone has done that can tell you how to do it within two minutes and not leave your house or have to put anything over on top of your pajamas. It's unbelievable.”
  • “I think we're living through the most amazing period of change, not just society-wise, but also in classical music. The organizations, particularly in the UK, that are in the establishment just haven't worked out what's going on and aren't adapting to societal change and the technology change as well. I think they're miles behind in general. So you can completely carve your own path by working out how you can get round these gatekeepers now.”
  • “Of late I've had a little bit of attention, people want me to go and talk at places. I find it quite interesting because I'm doing exactly what I was doing three and a half years ago. Nothing's changed. But all of a sudden, one thing leads to another and you get more awareness as to who you are and what you're doing. Similar thing, ‘Oh, you're an overnight success’ and it's, ‘No, I've been working like 70 hours a week for the last however long. It's quite a time now.’”
  • “Also, even though I failed at the YouTube channel, it was an important learning success. The skills I learned from video editing and filming were then taken and put into the orchestra in summer. So it's not as though it's been an entire waste of time. I've come through it learning more and learning more about how to talk to people, learning some filming skills. So it's been beneficial in the long run. But yeah, it's totally important to talk about when things go wrong and I'd love to say the last three and a half years have been perfect and I'm some sort of demi-god, but sadly that's not the case.”

Want to help the show? Here's a couple of ways you can do that!

1. Help me get to my next goal of $100 per episode on Patreon by pledging as little as $1 per episode to support the show: https://www.patreon.com/tempodcast.

2. My next iTunes goal is 100 ratings and 75 reviews. Take just a minute to leave a rating and review on iTunes to help me get there. Thank you!

And finally, a huge thank you to Parker Mouthpieces for providing the hosting for TEM.

Produced by Andrew Hitz

Show notes for all episodes of TEM including topics discussed, links to all books and websites referenced can be found at:

http://www.andrewhitz.com/shownotes

Article: Godin on difficult decisions

Andrew Hitz

Sometimes I deal with difficult decisions that I wish I didn't have to make in the worst way possible, I just put off making them. Hiding can be the easiest option for an entrepreneur (or a human) at times.

Seth Godin, in an as always brief blog post, breaks down how we can proceed when being forced to make a difficult decision.

(Note: The hardest part for me is ignoring sunk costs. That's really hard sometimes!)

Click the link in the tweet below.

TEM151: Keeping yourself inspired

Andrew Hitz

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TEM151: Keeping yourself inspired

Some thoughts on keeping yourself inspired as an entrepreneur.

What You'll Learn

  • How reading two books on any subject will make you an expert who knows more about that subject than 98% of the world
  • Why seeing live music is so important to me as an entrepreneur
  • The importance of having friends that are smarter than me

***I want to hear from you! Please leave me a comment below sharing what you do to keep inspired as an entrepreneur. I'll share some of your answers on the next TEM.***

Want to help the show? Here's a couple of ways you can do that!

1. Help me get to my next goal of $100 per episode on Patreon by pledging as little as $1 per episode to support the show: https://www.patreon.com/tempodcast.

2. My next iTunes goal is 100 ratings and 75 reviews. Take just a minute to leave a rating and review on iTunes to help me get there. Thank you!

And finally, a huge thank you to Parker Mouthpieces for providing the hosting for TEM.

Produced by Andrew Hitz

Show notes for all episodes of TEM including topics discussed, links to all books and websites referenced can be found at:

http://www.andrewhitz.com/shownotes

Article: Godin on the correlation between price and satisfaction

Andrew Hitz

Seth Godin's daily blog post was particularly good today. He talks about the relationship (or lack thereof) between price and satisfaction and includes this nugget about being sure you charge enough:

"Price is unrelated (in creating satisfaction), except for one thing: Charge enough that you can afford to actually keep your promise. The thrill of a low price disappears quickly, but the pain of a broken promise lasts a very long time."

I highly recommend taking 60 seconds to read the whole post.

Godin: Price and satisfaction

TEM150: How to 10x your progress and moving on quickly from your bad ideas - A conversation with Modacity's Marc Gelfo

Andrew Hitz

Marc Gelfo 1.jpeg

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TEM150: How to 10x your progress and moving on quickly from your bad ideas - A conversation with Modacity's Marc Gelfo

Marc Gelfo is the CEO and co-founder of Modacity.

I can't believe we made it to 150 episodes together! Thank you to each and every one of you for listening and for giving TEM your attention. I wouldn't have made it past the 10th episode without you!

Next stop: 200!

 

What You'll Learn:

  • How Marc used his experiences with cognitive science to approach practicing his horn more efficiently
  • The need for an embouchure change after Marc was already making a living as a professional horn player that inspired him to create software to help himself and others practice more efficiently
  • How different his first idea in this space was compared to what Modacity is today
  • The startup accelerator he joined in Silicon Valley that really forced him to question whether his ideas were viable business ideas
  • Why you need to kill your bad ideas as fast as you possibly can (and how to go about starting that process if you're not good at it)
  • The difference between visionaries and integrators and why those two types of people work so well together (and why partnering with someone is frequently a better idea than trying to change your type)
  • How any musician can up their progress up to 10x

  • The two different kinds of expectations and the four reactions we can have to them (really good stuff!)

  • How Marc discovered the importance of team as he developed Modacity

  • Why bringing on advisers as teammates can compliment your weaknesses (and how to pitch them)

  • How he achieves balance in his life (this was a different answer than I’ve ever heard to this question)

  • Where Marc sees software for musicians going in the future

 Links:

Want to help the show? Here's a couple of ways you can do that!

1. Help me get to my next goal of $100 per episode on Patreon by pledging as little as $1 per episode to support the show: https://www.patreon.com/tempodcast.

2. My next iTunes goal is 100 ratings and 75 reviews. Take just a minute to leave a rating and review on iTunes to help me get there. Thank you!

And finally, a huge thank you to Parker Mouthpieces for providing the hosting for TEM.

Produced by Andrew Hitz

Show notes for all episodes of TEM including topics discussed, links to all books and websites referenced can be found at:

http://www.andrewhitz.com/shownotes

TEM149: Don't blend in!

Andrew Hitz

TEM149: Don't blend in!

Why you need to double down on the only thing that makes you unique.

What You'll Learn:

  • Why the only thing that will ever make you truly unique is you
  • How to get people to consider hiring you to do what you instead of the thousands of other options
  • Why blending in is the worst thing an entrepreneur can ever do
  • A reminder that we're all pretty bad at everything until we do it a bunch
  • How I've attempted to brand TEM interviews a little differently than most podcasts
  • Action steps to not blend in:
    • Ask five people you trust what makes you stand out from everyone else in your corner of the music business and aggregate the list
    • Write down all of the ways you get yourself out to the world
    • Figure out specifically how to double down on what makes you you on each of those platforms
    • Design, execute and ship that content
    • Pay attention to whatever metrics you have deemed most useful to see if your new content has moved the needle at all

Want to help the show? Here's a couple of ways you can do that!

1. Help me get to my next goal of $100 per episode on Patreon by pledging as little as $1 per episode to support the show: https://www.patreon.com/tempodcast.

2. My next iTunes goal is 100 ratings and 75 reviews. Take just a minute to leave a rating and review on iTunes to help me get there. Thank you!

And finally, a huge thank you to Parker Mouthpieces for providing the hosting for TEM.

Produced by Andrew Hitz

Show notes for all episodes of TEM including topics discussed, links to all books and websites referenced can be found at:

http://www.andrewhitz.com/shownotes

TEM148: Spotted Online featuring Sarah Von Bargen, Ramit Sethi and Seth Godin

Andrew Hitz

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TEM148: Spotted Online featuring Sarah Von Bargen, Ramit Sethi and Seth Godin

Spotted Online features thought-provoking articles, podcast episodes and YouTube clips pertaining to all aspects of being a successful musical entrepreneur.

Today's featured content:

Want to help the show? Here's a couple of ways you can do that!

1. Help me get to my goal of $100 per episode on Patreon (only $16 to go!) by pledging as little as $1 per episode to support the show: https://www.patreon.com/tempodcast.

2. My next iTunes goal is 100 ratings and 75 reviews. Take just a minute to leave a rating and review on iTunes to help me get there. Thank you!

And finally, a huge thank you to Parker Mouthpieces for providing the hosting for TEM.

Produced by Andrew Hitz

Show notes for all episodes of TEM including topics discussed, links to all books and websites referenced can be found at:

http://www.andrewhitz.com/shownotes

TEM147: Pivot, Persevere or Punt - A conversation with Lance LaDuke

Andrew Hitz

Lance LaDuke Jackass.jpeg

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TEM147: Pivot, Persevere or Punt - A conversation with Lance LaDuke

We all have three options when faced with adversity. The key is figuring out which is the best path forward for any given situation.

This week's guest, Lance LaDuke, is my parter at Pedal Note Media, my former colleague with Boston Brass and the co-host of my other podcast, The Brass Junkies.

What You'll Learn:

  • The lesson Lance shares with every freshman at Carnegie Mellon right as they walk in the door

  • Why I named it The Entrepreneurial Musician and not The Musical Entrepreneur

  • The reason to try something now is because it will never go exactly how you think it’s going to go (it might even go better!)

  • The three options we have when faced with adversity
    • Pivot (This wall is really tall and I’m going to keep going but in a different direction)
      • Example #1: Lance learning trombone in order to win the Boston Brass audition
      • Example #2: Boston Brass keeping up with the movement of the market by collaborating with both the T'ang Quartet and Imani Winds
    • Persevere (You hit a wall and you just keep pedaling)
      • Example #1: The beginning of Pedal Note Media when it was a ton of work and we were losing money (for a good long while)
      • Example #2: How the Modern Musicking Center at Carnegie Mellon University took shape after years of Lance not quite figuring out exactly what it should look like
    • Punt (I’m giving up on this task so I can spend my time on something else)

      • Example #1: A group Lance formed 20 years ago that was great and well received in its short life but wasn’t the right thing moving forward for a host of reasons

      • Example #2: A show Lance produced called "Lance Learns to Play" (which was great and even got him a meeting at PBS!) that was far too much work for the return so he pulled the plug

Links:

1. Help me get to my goal of $100 per episode on Patreon (only $20 to go!) by pledging as little as $1 per episode to support the show: https://www.patreon.com/tempodcast.

2. My next iTunes goal is 100 ratings and 75 reviews. Take just a minute to leave a rating and review on iTunes to help me get there. Thank you!

And finally, a huge thank you to Parker Mouthpieces for providing the hosting for TEM.

Produced by Andrew Hitz

Show notes for all episodes of TEM including topics discussed, links to all books and websites referenced can be found at:

http://www.andrewhitz.com/shownotes

Investing in yourself

Andrew Hitz

What a beautiful way of thinking about this. Every time I read a nonfiction book, I am investing in my business skills, musicianship or teaching abilities. Any time I read a fiction book, I am investing in my imagination.

I have taken plenty of online courses, attended conferences and master classes, and done any number of other things to invest in myself over the years. I had just never really thought of it that way.

But Ramit's framing of it will only help to ensure that I'll keep plugging away on my current book (Gary Vaynerchuk's Crushing It!) so I can get on to the next investment.

TEM146: Solving the right problem plus some thought on Gary Varynerchuk's latest book, Crushing It!

Andrew Hitz

Crushing It.jpeg

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TEM146: Solving the right problem plus some thought on Gary Varynerchuk's latest book, Crushing It!

Making sure we are attempting to solve the right problem plus thoughts on Gary Vaynerchuk's new book.

We are hiring an intern! Visit pedalnotemedia.com/intern to become a part of the Pedal Note Media family. Application deadline is August 1st so apply today!

Are you looking for a coach to take your career to the next level? Visit andrewhitz.com/consulting to join the many musicians who have used TEM Consulting to make more money and have a greater impact in the music business.

What You'll Learn in TEM146:

  • The main problem you should be trying to solve (a lot of us frequently don't quite get this right)
  • Some of my thoughts on Gary Vaynerchuk's fantastic new book, Crushing It!

Links:

1. Help me get to my goal of $100 per episode on Patreon (only $20 to go!) by pledging as little as $1 per episode to support the show: https://www.patreon.com/tempodcast.

2. My next iTunes goal is 100 ratings and 75 reviews. Take just a minute to leave a rating and review on iTunes to help me get there. Thank you!

And finally, a huge thank you to Parker Mouthpieces for providing the hosting for TEM.

Produced by Andrew Hitz

Show notes for all episodes of TEM including topics discussed, links to all books and websites referenced can be found at:

http://www.andrewhitz.com/shownotes

TEM145: Finding your creative personal rhythm (TEM Short)

Andrew Hitz

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TEM145: Finding your creative personal rhythm (TEM Short)

A TEM Short on the importance of finding a creative rhythm that works best for you.

Links:

1. Help me get to my goal of $100 per episode on Patreon (only $20 to go!) by pledging as little as $1 per episode to support the show: https://www.patreon.com/tempodcast.

2. My next iTunes goal is 100 ratings and 75 reviews. Take just a minute to leave a rating and review on iTunes to help me get there. Thank you!

And finally, a huge thank you to Parker Mouthpieces for providing the hosting for TEM.

Produced by Andrew Hitz

Show notes for all episodes of TEM including topics discussed, links to all books and websites referenced can be found at:

http://www.andrewhitz.com/shownotes

You're behind. So what?

Andrew Hitz

"Quitting merely because you’re behind is a trap, a form of hiding that feels safe, but isn’t. The math is simple: whatever you switch to because you quit is another place you’re going to be behind as well."
—Seth Godin

Yet another truth bomb from Seth Godin.

You are always behind so using that as the primary reason to bail on something is just an excuse. Try to get to the heart of why you don't want to continue so you can decide if that is in fact the best thing for you moving forward.

Don't fall for the trap.

Godin: How far behind?

TEM144: Evolving career goals and finding your personal creative rhythm - A conversation with composer Dale Trumbore

Andrew Hitz

Listen via:

Dale Trumbore 2.jpeg

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TEM144: Evolving career goals and finding your personal creative rhythm - A conversation with composer Dale Trumbore

Dale Trumbore is a Los Angeles-based composer, author and teacher.

What You'll Learn:

  • The very narrow definition of success Dale had for herself (with a self-imposed age limit!) and why she adapted that definition over time
  • How she moved to LA but deviated from her original plan of becoming a film music composer
  • Why creating your ideal community doesn't necessarily involve where you live any more because you can create that community online if you look in the right places
  • Why the uneven income of an entrepreneur meant she had to get good with managing her money at an early age
  • The time of day Dale is most productive and why she advocates for everyone to find their own personal creative rhythm
  • How she analyzes her past career goals in order to inform her new ones
  • Tips to make a great website (which Dale feels quite strongly about!)
  • How to craft a personal and relevant email when asking someone for something
  • The importance of developing your own creative process and how that helps you to ride out the rough patches

Links:

1. Help me get to my goal of $75 per episode on Patreon (only $11 to go!) by pledging as little as $1 per episode to support the show: https://www.patreon.com/tempodcast.

2. My next iTunes goal is 100 ratings and 75 reviews. Take just a minute to leave a rating and review on iTunes to help me get there. Thank you!

And finally, a huge thank you to Parker Mouthpieces for providing the hosting for TEM.

Produced by Andrew Hitz

Show notes for all episodes of TEM including topics discussed, links to all books and websites referenced can be found at:

http://www.andrewhitz.com/shownotes

Your actions are far more telling than your thoughts

Andrew Hitz

A mentor once taught me to evaluate my belief systems by observing my actions and not by examining my thoughts.

If you are an entrepreneur and you only work on your business a couple of days a week and yet you find time to watch Netflix every day, you believe you can succeed while prioritizing Netflix over your business.

If you don't have enough money to properly market your entrepreneurial endeavor and yet you go out for drinks every weekend, you believe that going out for drinks is more important than getting the news about your product or service to the very people it could help.

If you are always tired and don't get enough sleep and yet you spend a full hour on your phone at night before you go to bed, you believe that scrolling through Instagram or Snapchat is more important than that extra hour of sleep and the productivity boost it will bring.

If you hope to win a major orchestral audition someday and your first notes of the day tend to be at 1:00 pm, you believe that you don't need to play all morning long and can still beat all of the people who start practicing hours earlier than that.

If you are learning to improvise but you transcribe one solo a year rather than one solo a week, you believe you can learn how to play jazz by transcribing far fewer solos than just about anyone who came before you and successfully learned the language of jazz.

Let me make one thing very clear: It is very much okay to prioritize going out with friends every weekend over having a marketing budget.

The problem occurs when our actions don't align with our goals. And especially when we don't realize it.

So what can you do about it? Here are some steps I propose to make sure you are the same page with yourself.

Action Steps:

  1. Write down your 1-year, 2-year and 3-year goals. Be specific. Only specific goals are measurable and only measurable goals can get you into the feedback loop that is essential for success.
  2. Take a week to document your actions. How long are you spending doing each activity? Which activity are you doing during your most productive hours? Write it down. Consider this an audit of your behavior. Be brutally honest about it.
  3. Figure out exactly where your actions are not 100% aligned with you achieving your 1-year, 2-year and 3-year goals and write down what changes will help get them perfectly aligned.

I once heard someone say that when setting goals, people frequently commit to doing way too much when making one-year goals and don't commit to nearly enough when making five-year goals. That's why I suggest one-year, two-year and three-year.

But do whatever works for you!

And remember, a goal that's not written down is just a wish.

So stop thinking about what you should be doing and examine what you actually are doing and make sure those actions are aligned with your clearly defined goals. If you do all of the above steps regularly the sky is the limit!

 

TEM143: Learning by Doing (TEM Short)

Andrew Hitz

TEM143: Learning by Doing (TEM Short)

Turns out you can't learn how to play by basketball by reading about how to play basketball.

Execute > Expect failure > Learn from it > Execute again

Links:

1. Help me get to my goal of $75 per episode on Patreon (only $11 to go!) by pledging as little as $1 per episode to support the show: https://www.patreon.com/tempodcast.

2. My next iTunes goal is 100 ratings and 75 reviews. Take just a minute to leave a rating and review on iTunes to help me get there. Thank you!

And finally, a huge thank you to Parker Mouthpieces for providing the hosting for TEM.

Produced by Andrew Hitz

Show notes for all episodes of TEM including topics discussed, links to all books and websites referenced can be found at:

http://www.andrewhitz.com/shownotes

Begin in the Middle

Andrew Hitz

"Begin in the middle."

—Seth Godin

That's from yet another concise and to the point blog post from my spirit animal, Seth Godin.

How many times have you started watching a YouTube video, Instagram story or Facebook video and you end up clicking 'next' within 10 seconds.

There is lots of data that a whole lot of us do this most of the time. There is way too much content out there to consume for us to stick with a video, podcast episode, blog post, ebook or Netflix series that doesn't immediately grab our attention.

So when creating content we've got two options:

  1. Complain to anyone who will listen about how technology is ruining attention spans and yearn for the glory days when things used to be so much better and blah blah blah
  2. We can begin in the middle

As Seth challenges us to do in that blog post, begin in the middle. Begin with the good part. Provide value to your listener/viewer/reader as soon as you have their attention. They will always be happy you did.

As a side note, that is exactly what I love about Seth Godin's blog posts. They are "high protein" as I like to call them. He gets right to the point. Like, every single day.

And that is precisely why of all the blogs in the world, his is the only one I have delivered to my inbox every day of every week. I can't imagine life without his blog and a big part of that is because I don't have to sift through the pleasantries to get to the good stuff.

If beginning in the middle works for Seth, it can work for the rest of us, too.

TEM142: Successfully launching a nationally acclaimed music institute before you can even legally drink: A conversation with Buddy Deshler

Andrew Hitz

Buddy Deshler 1.jpg

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TEM142: Successfully launching a nationally acclaimed music institute before you can even legally drink: A conversation with Buddy Deshler

The story behind how Buddy Deshler successfully launched the Fredericksburg Brass Institute at the age of 20 and the lessons he's learned along the way.

What You'll Learn:

  • The characteristics that led Buddy to not only have such big ideas but the followthrough to execute them as a 20-year-old
  • Why Buddy built his team based on the people on the team rather than on the specific mission (since that mission can and will change)
  • How the first iteration of FredBrass was a good idea but the wrong format and at the wrong time (and how they couldn't have figured that out until they tried and failed)
  • How the benefits of being young and naive help with networking fearlessly
  • How Buddy approached asking (and affording) big names for the first FredBrass when it obviously hadn't existed before
  • The failed attempt at FredBrass expansion in 2016 and what they learned from it
  • How Buddy developed his product, The Entrepreneurial Student, a presentation that he offers to universities and conservatories
  • The difference between networking and relationship building

Links:

1. Help me get to my goal of $75 per episode on Patreon (only $11 to go!) by pledging as little as $1 per episode to support the show: https://www.patreon.com/tempodcast.

2. My next iTunes goal is 100 ratings and 75 reviews. Take just a minute to leave a rating and review on iTunes to help me get there. Thank you!

And finally, a huge thank you to Parker Mouthpieces for providing the hosting for TEM.

Produced by Andrew Hitz

Show notes for all episodes of TEM including topics discussed, links to all books and websites referenced can be found at:

http://www.andrewhitz.com/shownotes

Article: Sometimes You Win the Race Because Everyone Else Stops Running

Andrew Hitz

"A huge, incredibly un-sexy ingredient in my success is that I’ve simply kept going. For almost 10 years, I’ve written blog posts, replied to comments, and promoted things I created. I’ve done this almost every blessed week day. For 10 years." 
—Sarah Von Bargen from the Yes and Yes Blog

I stumbled upon this great post via future TEM guest Dale Trumbore's twitter feed. (Her interview is recorded and will be released soon. Don't miss it because it is awesome!)

Such a simple concept and yet so important to hear. The un-sexy key is you just have to keep running. I highly recommend checking out this article.

(Click the link in Dale's tweet below)